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Aardvark Daily

New Zealand's longest-running online daily news and commentary publication, now in its 23rd year. The opinion pieces presented here are not purported to be fact but reasonable effort is made to ensure accuracy.

Content copyright © 1995 - 2017 to Bruce Simpson (aka Aardvark), the logo was kindly created for Aardvark Daily by the folks at aardvark.co.uk



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What the scammers say about this site

June 2008

Since I published these pages and posted the video below to YouTube, I've had a raft of responses from scammers who are fighting hard to defend themselves and their claims from the evidence I've presented.

One site even went so far as to post a blow-by-blow appraisal of my evidence and then declare that the YouTube video at the foot of that page was somehow *proof* that I was wrong and that HHO are not scams.

Well here's that video:

Did you hear any mention of HHO gas or electrolysis?

No you didn't - because this has absolutely *nothing* to do with these scammy HHO systems.

So how could this work? How can you have a car that really does appear to run on water?

Well anyone who has some basic high-school science behind them can figure it out - but watch this video for a little clue:

Yes, that's right. You can extract hydrogen from water very simply by simply introducing a metal such as lithium, sodium, potassium and a number of others. When this reaction takes place, the result is the release of hydrogen and the formation of an alkaline solution being a hydroxide of the metal involved.

The Japanese car picture uses a similar metal reaction with water to create hydrogen that is then fed into a hydrogen fuel-cell that generates electricity that then powers the small motors driving the wheels.

It does not breach the laws of thermodynamics and has absolutely nothing to do with the scams I'm talking about.

So why don't we all drive vehicles that generate their own hydrogen using lithium and water like the Japanese car?

Simple, it takes a lot of energy to produce metalic lithium from the natural ores found in nature. Only a tiny amount of that energy is returned in this reaction so the overall efficiency is extremely low. It's also a rather dangerous reaction and if exposed to air, lithium can spontaneously combust creating a fire that is very difficult to put out (adding water only generates more flamable hydrogen gas!).

The very fact that so many HHO scammers are using video of this vehicle as way to try and lend credibility to their scams shows that they are either totally ignorant of the science involved or (far more likely) simply resorting to even more deception in an attempt to empty your wallet.

Quick navigation of this feature:

Please spread the word to save people from wasting their cash and help put these scammers out of business. Link to the first page of this feature and tell your friends about it.


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