Google
 

Aardvark Daily

New Zealand's longest-running online daily news and commentary publication, now in its 23rd year. The opinion pieces presented here are not purported to be fact but reasonable effort is made to ensure accuracy.

Content copyright © 1995 - 2017 to Bruce Simpson (aka Aardvark), the logo was kindly created for Aardvark Daily by the folks at aardvark.co.uk



Please visit the sponsor!
Please visit the sponsor!

Debunking Stanley Meyer's claims

July 2008

Stanley Meyer was a scammer who claimed he'd been able to split water into hydrogen and oxygen with such efficiency that he could run an internal combustion engine (ICE) on nothing but water.

These claims, if they were true, would completely destroy our present understanding of energy conservation and the laws of thermodynamics.

So was Stan Meyer actually onto something? Did he really have a clever way to sidestep the laws of physics?

Well if you ask any of the devoted Meyer fan-base they'll swear black and blue that Stan was a genius and that the only reason we're not all driving around in water-powered cars right now is because the oil companies or the government had Meyer killed so as to suppress this invention.

So let's take a close look at Meyer's claims, his designs and the science he claims makes this possible.

Let's also take a look at exactly how Meyer died and whether he really was the victim of a huge conspiracy to ensure the profits of oil-barons and the unfettered power of government.

First up, take a look at these videos:

Key points in those videos:

  • Meyer had no qualifications as a scientist

  • the first cell shown draws half an amp at 110V (55W) but would appear to only produce less than a litre per minute -- no more efficient than an any other electrolysis cell

  • there's a claim that in regular electrolysis, three times as much energy is consumed as is produced in fuel (a 33% efficiency). This is clearly wrong -- it is very easy to achieve efficiencies of twice that with conventional electrolysis cells.

  • there is the misconception that gatting a patent for a device is some kind of proof that it works - which is "patently" untrue. The patent office doesn't test the designs it processes, it is simply a clerical operation where checks are made that the submitted documents meet certain criteria for completeness and correctness. There are a great many patents issued every year for devices that simply do not work.

  • those observers who claim that the cell was producing far more gas than they'd expect appeared to be taking Meyer's word for the amount of electrical energy that was being input. He used his own high-frequency modulator to drive the cells and there appears to be no independent testing to determine whether the power levels he claims were actually the power levels being used.

  • There were no independent scientists or others who were prepared to state categorically that Stan Meyer's technology actually worked as claimed.

The reality is that Stan Meyer was convicted of fraud in 1996 after he was unable to demonstrate his claims to investors or the court after soliciting large sums of money for commercializing his technology.

But what about the science? How did Meyer claim his over-unity hydrogen production system worked?

Here's a link to his patent but I'll summarize it like this:

Meyer claimed that by using a pulsating DC voltage instead of a constant one, he was able to resonate the water molecules in such a way that they split with only a small amount of energy being input. This could be likened to the way an opera singer can shatter a wine-glass by hitting the right note. Resonance means that each successive pulse of energy adds to the previous pulses until "breaking point" is achieved.

Now to anyone with only a modicum of understanding of science (and physics in particular) this sounds pretty plausible. Gosh, if it works on a wine-glass, why wouldn't it work for a water molecule?

Well the problem is that Meyer was using frequencies in the tens of kilohertz range - but water molecules have a resonant frequency of around 22GHz, and only when in vapor form (when in liquid state, the molecules are in such close proximity that very little resonance is observed at any frequency). Obviously Meyer's claims of establishing some kinds of resonance at a frequency that is some six orders of magnitude too low in frequency are a joke.

What Meyer has done is what many scam-artists do with bad-science.

They come up with an idea that has a basis in good science (electrolysis) and then claim to have developed some major breakthrough that extends it into the realm of miracle. To try and make themselves credible, they steal little snippets of science from other areas (such as resonance) and patch it in to what seems (in the eyes of those with a grade-school understanding of science), a credible explanation.

And if you're looking for further proof well ponder this... despite the patent process requiring full disclosure of how a device works, nobody has been able to reproduce Meyer's claims to the extent that they're verifiable by independent scientific testing.

Why is that?

Simple... because bad science doesn't work.

All bad science does is begat more bad science and this is a perfect example

To the scientifically naive, this guy may sound like he knows what he's talking about, but he's as full of BS as Meyer was. But hang on, isn't this guy a PhD? Shouldn't he know what he's talking about?

Well as is so often the case in the world of BS, this guy's credentials are highly questionable.

His "PhD" was apparently bestowed on him by a friend and is in the area of natural medicine.

And if, as he claims, there are companies that have developed this technology to the point where they're running systems on water with enough energy left over to do useful work -- why don't we hear about the? Why hasn't a Nobel prize been awarded for breaking the laws of thermodynamics? And why hasn't the government or the oil companies killed everyone who knows about this?

Yes, BS simply begats more BS I'm afraid.

Quick navigation of this feature:

Please spread the word to save people from wasting their cash and help put these scammers out of business. Link to the first page of this feature and tell your friends about it.


Rank This Aardvark Page

 

Change Font

Sci-Tech headlines

 


Features:

Beware The Alternative Energy Scammers

The Great "Run Your Car On Water" Scam

 

The Missile Man The Missile Man book

Recent Columns

Is there a throttle in your future?
I remember writing a column many years ago in which I predicted that all the fantastic new bandwidth provided by high-performance international data links and a fibre network would simply be consumed for the delivery of video entertainment...

eff you Google!
When Google arrived on the search scene, it was a breath of fresh air and the stark, ad-free, sparseness of its home page has remained an reminder of just what the Net is supposed to be about...

What will start WW3?
I've read a lot of opinions from some very smart people about what will be the cause of the next world war...

Those crazy Canadians eh?
As we all know, regulators around the world are struggling to get to grips with the thorny issue of regulating drones, especially drones that are flown by hobbyists for recreational purposes...

What Windows?
I want to set up another Windows machine to assist with my video editing but now face quite problem...

AI AI Uh-Oh!
Artificial Intelligence is in the news again, for all the wrong reasons...

Corporate Earth
There was a time when each sovereign nation on the planet was in control of its own affairs...

Water we going to do?
Just down the road from where I live is a town called Putaruru...

The year of the EV?
This year, like last year and next year, will be the year of the electric vehicle...

What have they done to HTML?
HTML was the very standard which kick-started the world-wide web as we know it...

Retro writing
I (not so) fondly recall my early years at school and getting to grips with the concept of learning to write...